On Line Cookbook
Oyster Pie - Oyster Pye
Home . Contents . Index . Search . Glossary
Print Friendly Recipe
Recipe Information
Description:
Traditional Maryland recipe from Great American Seafood Cookbook

Source:
Driscoll

Serves/Makes:6

Ingredients
  • Pie Pastry:
  • 2 cups (475 ml) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp (1 ml) salt
  • 2/3 cup (150 ml) chilled unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) ice water or more
  • Bechamel Sauce:
  • 2 to 2-1/4 cups (525 ml) milk
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 tbsp (60 ml) unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) all-purpose flour
  • liquor reserved from oysters
  • salt and freshly ground white pepper
  • pinch of cayenne pepper
  • generous pinch of ground mace
  • Filling:
  • 2 dozen small (yearling) oysters, drained and liquor reserved for sauce
  • 3 hard-cooked large eggs, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 14-1/2 oz (406 grm). can white or golden hominy, drained and rinsed
  • salt and freshly ground white pepper
  • mace
Preparation
  • Pastry:
  • Combine flour and salt in large bowl and shave fine slices of butter onto the flour and toss with fork to mix.
  • Sprinkle in 1/2 cup (125 ml) of the ice water while tossing with fork until pastry is moist enough to form into a ball. Add more water if necessary.
  • Wrap in waxed paper and chill for at least 1 hour.
  • Roll out two thirds of the pastry, cut to 12 inch circle and line bottom of 10 inch tart pan (type with removable bottom).
  • Roll remaining pastry into 11 inch circle for top of pie and place on baking sheet. Chill crusts for 30 minutes.
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees (200 C.).
  • Cover bottom crust and top crust with foil and weigh down with baking weights or dried beans (keeps flat).
  • Bake both crusts for 8 minutes then remove foil and weights and continue baking for 8 to 12 additional minutes uncovered, until golden brown, cool.
  • Sauce:
  • In small saucepan, scald 2 cups (475 ml) of milk with the bay leave over medium heat.
  • Let steep (off heat) for 5 minutes then discard bay leaf.
  • Melt butter in heavy-bottomed pan over medium heat being careful not to brown.
  • Whisk in the flour and cook, whisking constantly, for 3 minutes.
  • Pour in the warm milk and continue cooking, whisking constantly until thickened.
  • Whisk in the oyster liquor and additional milk if necessary to make a thick but pourable sauce.
  • Season with salt, white pepper, cayenne, and mace to taste.
  • Remove sauce from heat and add oysters, stirring gently to mix in.
  • Cover bottom crust (still in tart pan) with egg slices.
  • Sprinkle hominy over the eggs and season with salt and pepper.
  • Pour in the hot oyster sauce spreading evenly to edge of pastry.
  • Dust with additional mace.
  • Gently set the top crust in place and set the pie on a baking sheet. Bake at 400 degrees (200 C.) until pie is heated through, 12 to 15 minutes.
  • Be careful not to brown the pastry or over-cook the oysters.
  • Remove from oven and remove the sides of tart pan.
  • Serve immediately.
Comments
This pie is actually named the Sotterley Oyster Pye for the historic Sotterly Mansion in Maryland where lavish banquets served the dish. Oyster pie is wonderful-sounds unusual and is but tastes great. Nice with a fruity white wine. Recipe recreated by William Taylor a Maryland caterer and historian.

Quantity Calculator
Adjust the Serves/Makes quantity to:
Set to 0 for the original quantity
Email This To A Friend
Do you know someone who would like this recipe?
Fill in this form, then click 'Send Recipe'. The cookbook will email it to them.
Please be exact when entering the email addresses; otherwise, the recipe will get lost in cyberspace.

Mail to:
Your email:
Your name:

Copyright ©1997-2017 by Synergetic Data Systems Inc. All rights reserved.
SDSI neither endorses nor warrants any products advertised herein. All recipe content provided to SDSI is assumed to be original unless identified as otherwise by the submitter.

SDSI provides all content herein AS IS, without warranty. SDSI is not responsible for errors or omissions, nor for consequences of improper preparation, user allergies, or any other consequence of food preparation or consumption.

Send comments to our email. For more information, check our About the Cookbook page.